Exhibition opening | DIORMAG

16th April
Heritage

Tokyo, Spring-Summer 1958

From its inception, the House has found in Japan an inexhaustible source of inspiration, as evidenced in this tied-waist dress, baptized Tokyo.

16th April
Heritage

Dior in Japan

This week, Dior is taking you to Tokyo where several events are taking place. On April 19th, the haute couture spring-summer 2017 collection will get a new outing in a live show, with a number of new looks specially designed for the occasion by Maria Grazia Chiuri. In parallel, the Dior Homme fall 2017 collection by Kris Van Assche will be unveiled for the first time with a presentation. And, the following day, the new boutique will open its doors in GINZA SIX. Stay connected to get an immediate head start on discovering the story of Dior’s deep bond with Japan. 

Large panels painted in the style of Japanese prints decorated the stairway up to the ceiling,” Christian Dior recalled in his memoirs, describing the ground floor of his family home perched on the cliffs above Granville, in Normandy. “These interpretations of Outamaro and Hokusai were my Sistine Chapel. I used to spend hours just gazing at them.” Unsurprisingly, this country became an early source of inspiration; his lengthy childhood observations fostered a fondness for embroidered silks. This evocation of Japan appeared regularly throughout his collections, as in 1953 when he created an afternoon ensemble named Jardin japonais, and in 1954, when he created the kimono-inspired costume of the dancer Margot Fonteyn in the ballet Entrée Japonaise. In addition to being inspired by the different aspects of Japanese culture, Christian Dior also admired the idea of femininity with which he associated it, commenting in an interview: "Japanese women have a beauty all their own, and they must at all costs keep that delicacy which is their greatest charm.” And the fascination was a reciprocal one. In 1953, it was the turn of the Japanese to be seduced by the couturier’s creations, when the haute couture autumn-winter collection was shown in Tokyo. Throughout the trip, the house models from 30 Avenue Montaigne, brought specially from Paris, adopted the traditional kimono, as an allusion to this fusion of Japanese femininity and Parisian elegance.

The strong link between Dior and Japan has been perpetuated by the couturier’s successors. In 1959, the house of Dior was selected by Empress Michiko to create three dresses for her civil wedding. The Land of the Rising Sun has continuously inspired Dior’s various Creative Directors ever since: John Galliano made it the central theme of his spring-summer 2007 haute couture collection, with fabric origami and a coat displaying the wave motif from Hokusai’s famous print. Raf Simons in turn was inspired by the cosmopolitan energy of Tokyo and presented his fall 2015 show in the capital. It followed in the tradition of Dior shows held in Japan, organized in 1964, 1968 and 1986 with the creations of Marc Bohan, then in 1993 with those of Gianfranco Ferré. This tradition is being revived by the House with the haute couture spring-summer 2017 show. As the unequivocal expression of the reciprocated passion between Dior and Japan, the country has been the scene of a number of exhibitions dedicated to the House – Dior, the World of John Galliano & Tadao Ando in 1999, then Lady Dior As Seen By in 2012 and Esprit Dior Tokyo in 2014, which granted young Japanese artists carte blanche to reinterpret the Dior codes  – along with new boutiques, from the location inaugurated in Ginza in 1998, to the one opening its doors today in the same neighborhood. 

15th April
events

Exhibition opening

15th April
events

Dior: The Art of Color in Dubai

Take a look back at the opening of the exhibition Wednesday at the Fashion Catwalk Atrium in the Dubai Mall, followed by a dinner at INKED. Dior makeup ambassador Bella Hadid, Diala Makki, Natalia Shustova, Karen Wazen Bakhazi, Lana El Sahely, Dana Hourani, Ahmad Daabas and a host of others joined Peter Philips, Creative and Image Director of Dior Makeup, to celebrate the book Dior: The Art of Color.

12th April
Savoir Faire

On the Nosy Be Estate

12th April
Savoir Faire

In Search of an Essence: Ylang-ylang at Nosy Be

François Demachy travels the world seeking out the most beautiful raw materials for his Dior perfumes, such as the exceptional ylang-ylang that can be found in J’adore Injoy. Discover the secrets of a flower whose scent is customized by the House, from the island of Nosy Be to Grasse, in a new episode of the web documentary series created by Arthur de Kersauson and Clément Beauvais. 

It is “the flower of flowers”, readily blooming in tropical sunshine, but the best ylang-ylang is found only in Madagascar or the Comoros. For Dior, François Demachy chose to collaborate with the estate of Nosy Be, a small island off the coast of Madagascar, not only for its rare production quality, but also for its social and environmentally respectful values. Employees enjoy good living conditions, water is managed with an emphasis on recycling, and a plantation of eucalyptus and avocado trees guarantees the estate’s independence when it comes to firewood used for distillation.

Harvested by hand from branches that have been specially trained to facilitate the picking process, the Nosy Be ylang-ylang, which flowers throughout the year, undergoes an initial on-site distillation. However, this essence needs to be further worked in order to become even more faithful to the scent of the flower, in turn better marrying with the new facets of the J’adore Injoy bouquet. A journey to Grasse, the cradle of perfume flowers and their processing, is necessary. “The people in Grasse have a quasi-mystical approach to the natural products they wish to dramatically enhance, literally sublimating them,” explains François Demachy. “This attitude and science is to be found nowhere else. It makes subtle olfactive undertakings such as J’adore Injoy possible. This is from where the luxury of the Dior perfumes also comes.” And it’s thanks to a long process of fractionation performed by these Grasse experts that the ylang heart unique to Dior emerges in a pared down new essence rich with salty and sunny notes.  

11th April
latest news

J’adore Injoy

The new fragrance J’adore Injoy captures the senses with a bold floral-fruity-salty accord, an unusual olfactory deliciousness conceived by François Demachy, the House’s exclusive perfumer-creator.

J’adore Injoy… its name alone marks this fragrance out as both a declaration of pleasure and an exclamation of joy. To express these emotions, François Demachy has redefined the contours of the emblematic floral bouquet of J’adore around an unusual fleur de sel, along with a customized ylang-ylang. "With J’adore Injoy, I have created a unique fruity-salty accord that allows the white flowers to shine. A fleur de sel of today, that literally ‘smells’ of joy," explains François Demachy.

 

This surprising and strikingly charming new fragrance boasts spontaneity and an immediacy of pleasure. Alongside the existing J’adore flowers –  jasmine sambac, neroli and a host of others – shines ylang-ylang, a flower with highly special qualities. Grown on the island of Nosy Be, off the coast of Madagascar, it is then transformed in Grasse to obtain a ylang heart unique to Dior.

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