The Véronique Taittinger Collection for Dior MAISON | DIORMAG

06th June
latest news

The Giberto Arrivabene Collection
 for Dior MAISON

In his palazzo bordering the Grand Canal in Venice, Giberto Arrivabene employs his talents in the creation of Murano glass objects and artworks. For Dior MAISON he has created a series of objects in bright and deep colours that combine tradition and modernity, ranging from frames in rock crystal and agate to candle holders engraved with sprigs of lily-of-the-valley, along with other pieces such as paperweights and a carafe. He also designed a series of glasses called Hôtels Particuliers that act as an invitation to the world of grand Parisian mansions, and notably to 30 Avenue Montaigne. Check out his exclusive interview.

DIORMAG: Which Dior codes did you use as inspiration for this glass collection?

GIBERTO ARRIVABENE: Color was my main source  of inspiration, as there was not much Dior glass.  The powder pink and nude rose contrasting with black or deep grey. I’ve always loved the elegance of that color combination and it was one very much used by Dior. So it was easy for me to translate these colors into objects for Dior which were totally in sync with my personal taste. We had to work for some time to get the color absolutely spot on, using a blend of amethyst and white and turning them into that  gorgeous pink.

DM: What objects did you make for this collection?

G. A.: I made glasses with the typical Venetian delicate diagonal stripe engraving, dark grey with a poured pink border and vice versa. I made a carafe inspired by a jug I loved, barely visible in the background of a 16th century old master painting -  classic and timeless -  like how I see the house of  Dior. I made large paperweights  in the same color combination and I used a stunning Dior logo that existed  practically since the House’s inception, which I incorporated seamlessly into my glass objects.  I also did a Dior version of my Palazzo glasses,  entirely engraved with the façade of a palazzo, in this case not a Venetian one, but a Parisian hôtel particulier. The other codes I used were the lily-of-the-valley, which Dior always integrated into his work, and the star. Monsieur Dior invented a whole lifestyle. At 30 Avenue Montaigne his couture clients would have come for a dress and then, on their way downstairs, they would often buy a gift for their husband , or something to bring to their hostess for dinner that night.

DM : Tell us a bit about the tradition of glass making in Murano, and how you translated this savoir-faire into your Dior creations?

G. A. : In Murano all the glass is done by hand. From glass blowing to engraving, its painstakingly detailed work. To engrave just one of my palazzo glasses it takes over an hour and a half, so they are almost like works of art.

06th June
latest news

The Jérémy Maxwell Collection 

for Dior MAISON

Energized by his multitude of voyages across Africa and the United States, Jérémy Maxwell returned to France with a know-how and an unwavering passion for glassblowing. Working for the past year from his Paris atelier, Le Four, he produced his pieces without a mould. For Dior MAISON, the inspiration was clear. The artist designed royal blue vases, in honor of the House codes, and the nobility of his art. Discover his exclusive interview.

DIORMAG: What is your vision of the house of Dior ?

JEREMY MAXWELL: When I think of Dior, it's the word ‘flawless’ that comes to mind. At Dior, perfection is the appropriate order of the day. To be invited to participate in that is a real honour.

DM: How have you transposed this vision into your creations for Dior Maison?

J.M.: It was a real challenge, because the tiniest defect and I have to start over. A single drop of sweat falls onto it and it’s ruined. But that’s just part of the process.

DM: In what way does this collection channel your own artistic universe?

J.M.: It's fluid and sophisticated.

DIORMAG: What was your starting point, inspirationwise?

J.M.: The colors on the mood board: pink, midnight blue, grey and white. The midnight blue being a royal color, I decided that the craftsmanship would be royal. The story behind this comes from the 13th century, when the knights had returned from the Crusades, many of them had discovered blown glass in Mesopotamia and asked the king if they could practice this art. In 1301, the king decreed that the only manual work that could be considered suitable for a noble was that of the glass blower. I love that story.

DM: Which aspect of savoir-faire did you highlight in this collection?

J.M.: The technique of hand blowing, without a mould. In general, when a designer designs a piece, a mould of the design is produced into which the blower will blow. This suggests that the blower becomes replaceable, and that, eventually, a robot could blow into a mould. I categorically refuse to work like that. When you work purely with the hand and the eye, with your judgement and instinct, the glass develops its own identity, dictating the form it wants to take. There's a lot of poetry and freedom. Each piece has its own story, it's impossible to exactly make the same thing twice. And thank goodness for that, because otherwise I’d get bored very quickly.

06th June
latest news

The Véronique Taittinger Collection
 for Dior MAISON

Indulging her passion for porcelain through her collaboration with Dior MAISON, Véronique Taittinger reinterpreted the themes of lily-of-the-valley and cannage on plates and full dinner services made in Limoges, France, the historic cradle of porcelain.  Discover her exclusive interview.

DIORMAG: What is your vision of the house of Dior ?

VERONIQUE TAITTINGER: Dior, for me, represents France, glamour, seduction, but also the passion contained in craftsmanship. And then creativity. Christian Dior is an icon of fashion, of course, but what I find incredible is his didactic, assured side. He didn't go to art school, he just started out like that.

 

DIORMAG: How have you transposed this vision into your creations for Dior MAISON?

VERONIQUE TAITTINGER: By trying to be both poetic and contemporary. There’s a touch of playful irreverence, too, in the way the collection twists things. While remaining faithful to Dior, certain codes saw a playing with form and shape, as models were reconceived. It’s a new take. 

 

DIORMAG: In what way does this collection channel your own artistic universe?

VERONIQUE TAITTINGER: In the finesse with which it’s produced and the approach to color. It's difficult to be satisfied when you're as meticulous as I am. I was very anxious to know if it would work out as I had imagined it. Luckily everything went very well.

 

DIORMAG: What was your starting point, inspirationwise?

VERONIQUE TAITTINGER: The history of Christian Dior. I filled my mood board with everything I found: colors, makeup palettes, leopard print… I really devoured it all. I also drew from the old collections, and from more modern ones, especially for the floral motifs. He really liberated the woman's body.

 

DIORMAG: Which aspect of savoir-faire did you highlight in this collection?

VERONIQUE TAITTINGER: I wanted to highlight the craftsmanship and the pure delicacy of what that means, such as the Dior embroideries, which are so extraordinary. I had to find a way to bring this couture aspect to the plates, being equally rigorous when it came to placement. And to find the right form, round, rustic, floral. It was an intense, wonderful adventure.  

06th June
latest news

The Hubert Le Gall Collection
 for Dior MAISON

Scenographer and designer, Hubert Le Gall explores the codes of childhood and the plant and animal worlds to create furniture and objects brimming with poetry. From his atelier in Montmartre, which used to belong to the painter Pierre Bonnard, the artist’s designs for Dior MAISON represent his first foray into porcelain. This isn't Hubert Le Gall’s first collaboration with the House, however, as he has already designed furniture pieces for a number of Dior boutiques around the world. Discover his exclusive interview.

DIORMAG: What is your vision of the house of Dior?

HUBERT LE GALL: Femininity and seduction. The Dior woman is like a flower in bloom. She's sexy and embraces her femininity. For me this brings to mind an idea of elegance, and a delicate use of color.

DIORMAG: How have you transposed this vision into your creations for Dior MAISON?

HUBERT LE GALL: I wanted the cups, mugs and coffee service to approach the notion of couture. There's the significance of the bow that shapes the waist, holding and emphasizing it. I focused on the idea of a Dior woman with a satin ribbon tied beneath her bust. The keywords were simplicity and femininity. I was never particularly interested in adding color because the shine, the gold and silver evoke luxury just as well.

DIORMAG: In what way does this collection channel your own artistic universe?

HUBERT LE GALL: It's representative of my universe in that it plays with codes.  The valet trays have a certain poetry thanks to the lily-of-the-valley, which is a bringer of good luck and a code of the house of Dior.

DIORMAG: What was your starting point, inspirationwise?

HUBERT LE GALL: How to work with porcelain, a new material for me as I am used to working with bronze.

DIORMAG: Which aspect of savoir-faire did you highlight in this collection?

HUBERT LE GALL: I believe very strongly about the development and promotion of French savoir-faire. I believe we should take advantage of all the extraordinary talent that surrounds us. I was very happy to have been able to access some of this knowledge. And this, in turn, has had an influence on my own personal work.

06th June
latest news

The Peter Marino Collection 

for Dior MAISON

The star architect Peter Marino, the talent behind the new architectural concept of New Bond Street, has designed a series of three bronze boxes for Dior MAISON.

Heading up his own practice in New York, Peter Marino redefines modern luxury through his work all over the world. The recipient of a multitude of distinctions, he was also honored as a Chevalier de l’Ordre des Arts et des Lettres by the French Minister of Culture. He has made an important contribution to the promotion of French elegance, continuing the legacy of Christian Dior. For Dior MAISON, he has created three bronze boxes, made in France, numbered and signed by him, inspired by his famous collection of cabinets. "I love the sensual nature of bronze. It's an incredibly beautiful and powerful material. With its great longevity, the fact that these pieces will likely outlast us is a compelling idea," says Peter Marino.

06th June
latest news

Dior MAISON

The new House of Dior boutique in London is the setting for an exclusive Dior MAISON collection. We take a look.

©

Adrien Dirand

Living in a house that doesn't reflect who you are is akin to wearing someone else's clothes," Christian Dior used to say. Upon opening his first boutique, at 30 Avenue Montaigne, the couturier designed a space devoted to the home, a highly personal and direct way of sharing his taste in art de vivre and the art of entertaining. In keeping with this long-established spirit, the new House of Dior boutique in London unveils an exclusive Dior MAISON collection that encapsulates that same level of refinement with which Christian Dior decorated his residences in Paris, Milly-la-Forêt, and La Colle Noire in Provence. Among the wide variety of objects offered by Dior MAISON is a selection of teas inspired by the House's iconic fragrances, a collection of crystal glassware embellished with a gold couture stitch, and hand-embroidered home linens. Artists and designers will regularly create limited-edition pieces. The first Dior MAISON collaborations, which can be discovered in the House of Dior in London, bring together creations by, among others, the architect Peter Marino, scenographer and designer Hubert Le Gall, the glass master Jeremy Maxwell, and home linens specialist Véronique Taittinger.

05th June
latest news

Collection by Marc Quinn for Dior

To mark the opening of the House of Dior on New Bond Street in London, Dior unveils a limited-edition collection of Lady Dior bags and small leather accessories reinterpreted by the British artist Marc Quinn.

To reinterpret the iconic Lady Dior bag, the House turned to the London-based artist Marc Quinn. A renowned figure in the world of contemporary art, the artist has transposed his hyper-realistic and color-drenched oil paintings to Dior creations. In his “In The Night Garden” series, violet, white or black orchids bloom against a backdrop of volcanic earth, creating a captivating artificial atmosphere. The artist also offers a “Fossil Record” version of the Lady Dior, with a floral motif embossed on silvered leather.

 

The motifs represent flowers forever frozen in full bloom, as if to contradict a disturbing subtext: the uncontrollable human desire to control nature. The Lady Dior bags and small leather accessories are thus transformed into works of art through which the artist questions man and his relationship with nature as untameable beauty. On another piece, it’s the bright blue iris of an eye, from the series "We Share Our Chemistry with the Stars," that grabs and captivates us. The artist also notes that "the word ‘iris’ comes from the Greek word for ‘rainbow’, and the colors celebrate individuality", adding: "In the middle, there’s the black void of the pupil, which recalls the mystery and uncertainty of existence." Marc Quinn has also designed clutches and wallets, matching the Lady Dior bags, to complete this limited-edition collection. With this unique collaboration, the House writes a new page in the story of the profound and sincere connection it has always enjoyed with the world of art.

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