Rose des Vents: Time Travel | DIORMAG

11th September
Savoir Faire

The Savoir-faire of the J’adior Pumps: The Video

11th September
Savoir Faire

The Savoir-faire of the J’adior Pumps

"A little ribbon bow has always been one of the favorite and most feminine of accessories. It is rare when you don't find a little bow somewhere on a woman's clothes,” wrote Christian Dior in his Little Dictionary of Fashion. Debuting at Maria Grazia Chiuri’s first Dior show, the J’adior pumps are decorated with an artisanally embroidered ribbon.

To discover the making of these shoes, one must first go to the Florentine hinterland, to a family-run embroidery atelier. Surrounded by hundreds of bobbins of thread, sewing machines, under the watchful eye of seamstresses, produce ecru ribbons adorned with black "J'adior" motifs in relief. Since these inscriptions are created from a single black thread, the link between each letter must be separated by hand. After applying a stain-resistant treatment, the seamstresses cut out the ribbons which are arranged on large organza panels. Each ribbon requires more than seventy-five thousand stitches, and it takes three-and-a-half hours of work per pair of shoes to make these embellishments.

Then it's off to the House’s workshops to follow the development of this black patent calf leather pump, mounted on a six-and-half centimeter heel. This heritage heel referred to as "pied-de-chèvre" is inspired by a model designed for the haute couture autumn-winter 1962 show. Identifiable by its subtly curved form, it lends a light and relaxed gait, the essence of simplicity. To achieve such a result, the heelmaker has fashioned the resin to attain the perfect silhouette, one that combines aesthetics with perfect balance. For his part, the lastmaker, with the sketch as a guide, carves a block of wood into a form that will aid the modelmaker in creating the patterns for the leather elements. To do this, he coats the last with a layer of PVC and directly marks the pump’s outlines. When the patterns are ready, it's time to select the leathers. The artisan's honed eyes examine and scrutinize, while his skilled hands touch, measure, and mark out any imperfections. The shoe’s quality begins with the choice of leather.

After cutting out the thirty-two pieces of leather and placing reinforcements here and there, he positions the upper - the top part of the pump - on a last made to the exact measurements of the J’adior, then steams it.  Thanks to the variations in temperature, the craftsman can mold the leather into the required shape. It is an operation based on instinct. He folds in the sides to create the toe point and uses a row of tacks to fix the whole to the insole, a sole that has the distinction of having a metal plate concealed within. Subsequently, the heel is supported by a metal pin that runs through it, and further held by some additional nails. In this way, stability is assured. The craftsman positions the sole of the shoe by hand then a machine presses it in one go. Upon completion, each J’adior is subject to a comprehensive quality control: its leather, stitching and structure, everything is checked before being cleaned and polished up. 

10th September
latest news

Rose des Vents: Time Travel

To mark the arrival in stores of the new Mini D de Dior Rose des Vents watch, the Creative Director of Dior Joaillerie Victoire de Castellane has produced a charming new animation illustrating a journey through time in the company of Christian Dior.

09th September
events

Interview with Stephen Jones

Behind the scenes of the exhibition The House of Dior: Seventy Years of Haute Couture, the British milliner, who is currently celebrating two decades of collaboration with the House, discusses his work with the various Dior creative directors. 

09th September
events

Guided Tour 

Artistic director Maria Grazia Chiuri, museum director Tony Ellwood and curator Katie Somerville speak about the exhibition The House of Dior: Seventy Years of Haute Couture.

09th September
events

The House of Dior, Seventy Years of Haute Couture

Get a glimpse of the exhibition The House of Dior: Seventy Years of Haute Couture running at the National Gallery of Victoria in Melbourne until 7 November 2017.

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    Sean Fennessy

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    Sean Fennessy

Numbering one hundred and forty, the haute couture creations on display in this gorgeous exhibition come from the mind not only of Christian Dior but also those of his successors, from Yves Saint Laurent to Raf Simons and Maria Grazia Chiuri, encompassing Marc Bohan, Gianfranco Ferré and John Galliano along the way. Along with these are accessories, ranging from the hats designed by Stephen Jones, the famous British milliner who has been collaborating with Dior for twenty years, to the first amphorae for the legendary perfume Miss Dior, as well as shoes designed by Roger Vivier. The experience starts with the creations of Christian Dior himself. Some are drawn from the House’s first collection, unveiled on 12 February 1947 and dubbed the New Look. Here visitors can discover the emblematic Bar suit with its revolutionary pure lines, before continuing the journey with the codes that have run through the House’s history, such as flowers and the 18th century. The exhibition goes on to offer an immersion into the special atmosphere and exceptional savoir-faire of the haute couture ateliers at 30 Avenue Montaigne, which have been the House’s beating heart since 1947. The creations of the couturier’s successors are also highlighted, such as the red coat-dress designed by Raf Simons for autumn-winter 2012-2013, along with the Essence d’herbier cocktail dress in organza entirely embroidered with raffia and silk thread flowers, designed by Maria Grazia Chiuri for her first haute couture collection for Dior. 

09th September
events

Stars in Dior in  Melbourne

We take a look back at the opening night event for the exhibition The House of Dior: Seventy Years of Haute Couture, which took place a few days ago at the National Gallery of Victoria, in Melbourne. For the occasion Nicole Kidman chose an haute couture bustier dress in a dégradé of pink and mauve silk and feathers, while Elizabeth Olsen wore a midnight blue satin shirt and skirt, and  Winnie Harlow was in a navy blue silk evening dress.  

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