The Weekend Red Carpets | DIORMAG

13th September
latest news

The Rouge Liquid Campaign

A bold and liberated Natalie Portman enthusiastically embraces newness in the latest Rouge Dior campaign. With Rouge Liquid, capturing a simultaneous rock and glamorous vibe, the young woman plays freely with the intense colors and vibrant finishes, going from a high-impact matte red to a deep metallic plum. 

13th September
latest news

New Generation Rouge Dior

The actress and muse Natalie Portman is revealed in a new light to embody with untamed sensuality two innovations in the Rouge Dior range: Rouge Liquid and Double Rouge. These two new methods of playing with color were conceived by Peter Philips, Creative and Image Director of Dior Makeup.  

Rock and rebel – that’s the new facet of Natalie Portman captured in this new campaign by the photographer David Sims. Her lips express at the glamour and unfettered sensuality of a new generation of Rouge Dior. Much more than just a lipstick, it’s a gesture, an attitude, a manifesto that Christian Dior came up with in 1953 when he declared his desire “to dress women’s smiles”. The House has been endlessly celebrating and revisiting its lipstick ever since. This year Peter Philips, Creative and Image Director of the House’s makeup, reveals two new additions to the Rouge Dior family: Rouge Liquid, an intensely-hued melting Dior ink, and Double Rouge, a lipstick with a double matte and metallic effect. Two new ways to have fun with color, instinctively and creatively, and push the possibilities. 

11th September
VIP

The Weekend Red Carpets

From Julianne Moore, Kristin Scott Thomas and Saskia de Brauw to Kris Van Assche, Colin Farrell and a host of others, take a look at the stars who wore Dior and Dior Homme over the weekend, at the film festivals in Toronto and Venice, as well as at the BoF 500 gala dinner in New York.

11th September
Savoir Faire

The Savoir-faire of the J’adior Pumps: The Video

11th September
Savoir Faire

The Savoir-faire of the J’adior Pumps

"A little ribbon bow has always been one of the favorite and most feminine of accessories. It is rare when you don't find a little bow somewhere on a woman's clothes,” wrote Christian Dior in his Little Dictionary of Fashion. Debuting at Maria Grazia Chiuri’s first Dior show, the J’adior pumps are decorated with an artisanally embroidered ribbon.

To discover the making of these shoes, one must first go to the Florentine hinterland, to a family-run embroidery atelier. Surrounded by hundreds of bobbins of thread, sewing machines, under the watchful eye of seamstresses, produce ecru ribbons adorned with black "J'adior" motifs in relief. Since these inscriptions are created from a single black thread, the link between each letter must be separated by hand. After applying a stain-resistant treatment, the seamstresses cut out the ribbons which are arranged on large organza panels. Each ribbon requires more than seventy-five thousand stitches, and it takes three-and-a-half hours of work per pair of shoes to make these embellishments.

Then it's off to the House’s workshops to follow the development of this black patent calf leather pump, mounted on a six-and-half centimeter heel. This heritage heel referred to as "pied-de-chèvre" is inspired by a model designed for the haute couture autumn-winter 1962 show. Identifiable by its subtly curved form, it lends a light and relaxed gait, the essence of simplicity. To achieve such a result, the heelmaker has fashioned the resin to attain the perfect silhouette, one that combines aesthetics with perfect balance. For his part, the lastmaker, with the sketch as a guide, carves a block of wood into a form that will aid the modelmaker in creating the patterns for the leather elements. To do this, he coats the last with a layer of PVC and directly marks the pump’s outlines. When the patterns are ready, it's time to select the leathers. The artisan's honed eyes examine and scrutinize, while his skilled hands touch, measure, and mark out any imperfections. The shoe’s quality begins with the choice of leather.

After cutting out the thirty-two pieces of leather and placing reinforcements here and there, he positions the upper - the top part of the pump - on a last made to the exact measurements of the J’adior, then steams it.  Thanks to the variations in temperature, the craftsman can mold the leather into the required shape. It is an operation based on instinct. He folds in the sides to create the toe point and uses a row of tacks to fix the whole to the insole, a sole that has the distinction of having a metal plate concealed within. Subsequently, the heel is supported by a metal pin that runs through it, and further held by some additional nails. In this way, stability is assured. The craftsman positions the sole of the shoe by hand then a machine presses it in one go. Upon completion, each J’adior is subject to a comprehensive quality control: its leather, stitching and structure, everything is checked before being cleaned and polished up. 

10th September
latest news

Rose des Vents: Time Travel

To mark the arrival in stores of the new Mini D de Dior Rose des Vents watch, the Creative Director of Dior Joaillerie Victoire de Castellane has produced a charming new animation illustrating a journey through time in the company of Christian Dior.

09th September
events

Interview with Stephen Jones

Behind the scenes of the exhibition The House of Dior: Seventy Years of Haute Couture, the British milliner, who is currently celebrating two decades of collaboration with the House, discusses his work with the various Dior creative directors. 

More items