Toile de Jouy Savoir-Faire | DIORMAG

04 June
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Rose de Mai: at the Heart of Dior Fragrances 

Harvested in Grasse, the cradle of perfumery and the prized source for Dior perfumes, the rose is at the core of the House’s history. Its blooming each year is an event to celebrate. 

When Christian Dior acquired the Château de la Colle Noire, not far from Grasse, it was the rose de mai, commonly known as the centifolia rose, an icon of this world-famous terroir, that he decided to cultivate. Beloved of the couturier, since the beginning of the House it has been blooming on its creations and lending its powerful and sensual notes to its perfumes. It radiates from the heart of Miss Dior, the perfume that accompanied the history-making feminine curves of the New Look. “It's the scent of love. That's how Christian Dior wanted it and how it must remain, with consistency, ardor, energy and passion,” explains François Demachy, Dior's exclusive Perfumer-Creator who has also revisited this iconic bouquet as an Eau de Parfum.

For Miss Dior, the producers meet every year in Grasse for the rose de mai harvest. This picking process, which lasts a month, is a highly-anticipated event. Armelle Janody, who passionately relives a sensory story with each harvest, evokes these unique sensations: “the profusion of petals in which one plunges one’s hands, the peppery sap that leaves its smell on the fingers.”

01 June
Shows

Lacemaking Savoir-Faire 

In order to create this long dress’ white lace, Maria Grazia Chiuri was inspired by vintage models and more particularly a collar drawn from the archives of the lacemaker Potencier Broderies. The original motif, enriched with cotton flowers, has been redrawn stitch by stitch before being saved into a computer program. Then, in the final step of this modern technique, it is meticulously cut out to produce the transparent guipure effect and give body to the dress’ flounces.   

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Potencier Broderies

01 June
Shows

Toile de Jouy Savoir-Faire

A key motif of this cruise collection and a great French classic from the 18th century, toile de Jouy has been given a modern makeover with the addition of a series of wild animals. Among these, tigers, bears and giraffes were hand drawn like engravings in pen and ink to populate these typically pastoral scenes. In traditional dyes (blue, red and green) and lifted with touches of unprecedented color such as camel or black, the revisited fabric makes its way onto trench coats, skirts, jeans and some of the House’s bags.  

31 May
Shows

Mexican Embroideries Savoir-Faire 

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31 May
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Embroidery Savoir-Faire 

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31 May
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Lace Savoir-Faire in Photos

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31 May
Shows

Toile de Jouy Savoir-Faire in Photos

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